LEARNING MORE FROM BBC PODCASTS

In the past couple of weeks or so, I have downloaded several BBC Learning English and BBC World Book Club podcasts and I have as well tried to listen to them all. Although listening to them all is not as easy as one would think, (because the podcasts are about forty or so approximately) they serve up themselves when I ned them. I try as much as possible to listen to them one day at a time but I prefer the World book club podcasts featuring the likes of Maya Angelou, Wole Soyinka, John Boyne (author of The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas), Chinua Achebe, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, John Grisham, Ben Okri, Salman Rushdie (author of Midnight’s Children). Some of the aforementioned names have passed on, but the words they spoke in these podcasts remain to this day. I remember listening to the BBC World book club programme on radio in my room back then at my birthplace, Ankpa, Kogi State, Nigeria, and I listened to the interviews with Chinua Achebe, John Boyne and Wole Soyinka; it was absolutely amazing because it was a new stuff to me and something that increased the burning creative desire inside of me. Before the recording of the world book club meeting with John Boyne, I somehow managed to get a free copy of ‘The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas’ sent to me from the BBC World Service and I was amazed. I still imagine how it all happened and how the organizers took my request and sent me an only copy left even though they informed me that they do no such things as send copies of books to their audience. Well, listening to most of the podcasts again give me a sense of belonging to the literary and also to the creative world. Even with the many books that appear daily on bookstands, it is important that little beginnings are spurred by some greats like the ones mentioned previously.
There is nothing as beautiful as having a road map to navigate the rigorous world of creativity. The many facets of opinions from these great writers and many more which combines a dose of what they know, what they have been made to know or what they llearnt over the years and what they expect some of us to know, I think this is beyond direction.

Examination: nervous conditions! By Attah, John

Examinations are necessary aspects of our daily lives especially for those in the academic field. Whether you belong to the pre-nursery, nursery, pre-primary, primary, secondary, tertiary or ‘post-tertiary’ categories, you are bound to come across examinations as part of your test to show if you have learnt anything from all you have been taught. I remember my days especially at the secondary and tertiary school levels where examinations brought a mixture of fear, nervousness and excitement. Sometimes i had to study harder than usual to make the grades and at other times what i wrote was a representation purely of what i had read and what i understood. The tension in an exam hall sometimes made your hand shake, sweat seep out of your skin or your forehead, your previously beautiful handwriting taking the form of someone learning how to use an ink pen to write for the first time. I recall sometimes when you forget some important points and don’t remember at all for the rest of the examination period. I recall one exam in my third year in the university where i was given the question paper. I think it was a course on African poetry. My lecturer then, Mr. Fidelis Okoro, was dreaded because some persons believed only few could ever pass his courses. At that time, i had passed through the man from my first year and did not experience anything close to disaster from his ‘throne.’ I sat in my seat, thinking about the questions on the white sheet in front of me. I just went through all the questions and thought: ‘Oh God! Did i really read anything for this course?’ I was terrified and at the same time confident but where would my confidence lead me? I looked into my question paper for more than fifteen minutes or so without guessing where i should start from and what i should write. I just looked around the large full-packed classroom and no one seemed to figure out what to write exactly. It took me a long time to write anything and although in my mind i did not consider them that meaningful, i told myself God would do something special. In summary, i had a ‘B’ grade when the results were released. I was one of the few beneficiaries from the ‘B’ grades made available to my class. Few passed and alot of persons, well, did fail! It was no surprise to me the failure but i was surprised to see a ‘B’ grade attached to my registration number. I nearly cried but that is exactly something that happens when you think you never wrote well. As i think about those times, i look at the students at one of the private schools here in Gombe where i teach who are writing their exams. There is a feeling of anxiety surrounding them whatever be the percentage. Some of them are unsure if they were taught whatever they see on their question papers. The nervy feeling of some may never make them think straight enough to write the best ways to earn good enough marks to enable them scale through. I pity some of them though and smile because i had faced similar and maybe more anxiety-flooded situations before. Well, examinations must always be written and we must either pass or fail even though alot of us would never prefer the latter. Afterall,no one associates with failure. We always strive to succeed and that is important but the anxiety alot of times must always come but how we respond to it matters alot for our success or failure. I wish them and all those writing examinations at various levels luck and success. Ciao!

Examination: nervous conditions! By Attah, John

Examinations are necessary aspects of our daily lives especially for those in the academic field. Whether you belong to the pre-nursery, nursery, pre-primary, primary, secondary, tertiary or ‘post-tertiary’ categories, you are bound to come across examinations as part of your test to show if you have learnt anything from all you have been taught. I remember my days especially at the secondary and tertiary school levels where examinations brought a mixture of fear, nervousness and excitement. Sometimes i had to study harder than usual to make the grades and at other times what i wrote was a representation purely of what i had read and what i understood. The tension in an exam hall sometimes made your hand shake, sweat seep out of your skin or your forehead, your previously beautiful handwriting taking the form of someone learning how to use an ink pen to write for the first time. I recall sometimes when you forget some important points and don’t remember at all for the rest of the examination period. I recall one exam in my third year in the university where i was given the question paper. I think it was a course on African poetry. My lecturer then, Mr. Fidelis Okoro, was dreaded because some persons believed only few could ever pass his courses. At that time, i had passed through the man from my first year and did not experience anything close to disaster from his ‘throne.’ I sat in my seat, thinking about the questions on the white sheet in front of me. I just went through all the questions and thought: ‘Oh God! Did i really read anything for this course?’ I was terrified and at the same time confident but where would my confidence lead me? I looked into my question paper for more than fifteen minutes or so without guessing where i should start from and what i should write. I just looked around the large full-packed classroom and no one seemed to figure out what to write exactly. It took me a long time to write anything and although in my mind i did not consider them that meaningful, i told myself God would do something special. In summary, i had a ‘B’ grade when the results were released. I was one of the few beneficiaries from the ‘B’ grades made available to my class. Few passed and alot of persons, well, did fail! It was no surprise to me the failure but i was surprised to see a ‘B’ grade attached to my registration number. I nearly cried but that is exactly something that happens when you think you never wrote well. As i think about those times, i look at the students at one of the private schools here in Gombe where i teach who are writing their exams. There is a feeling of anxiety surrounding them whatever be the percentage. Some of them are unsure if they were taught whatever they see on their question papers. The nervy feeling of some may never make them think straight enough to write the best ways to earn good enough marks to enable them scale through. I pity some of them though and smile because i had faced similar and maybe more anxiety-flooded situations before. Well, examinations must always be written and we must either pass or fail even though alot of us would never prefer the latter. Afterall,no one associates with failure. We always strive to succeed and that is important but the anxiety alot of times must always come but how we respond to it matters alot for our success or failure. I wish them and all those writing examinations at various levels luck and success. Ciao!

ROLE MODELS AND PRESSURE: LESSONS FOR ROLE MODELS AND FOLLOWERS

ROLE MODELS AND PRESSURE: LESSONS FOR ROLE MODELS AND FOLLOWERS

                                                  BY JOHN ATTAH

 

Many a times our role models are those who have accomplished one thing or the other. It’s quite difficult to find someone taking a poor or an unaccomplished person as his or her role model. Who are role models to us? Perhaps, they are persons who possess certain traits and abilities that we crave for or those whose personalities show what we love. Sometimes, we cannot say why we love, adore and cherish those role models of ours. Some of them are professionals in their varied fields while others only exhibit qualities we see and fall for immediately.

While growing up as a child, I didn’t know who a role model was and I never recalled having any. I loved a lot of persons and admired others too for who they were or what they were. I never categorized them under role models. I knew for instance, Pele, the great Brazilian footballer; Maradona, the footballer who was always in the news at the time he dealt with England and his later decline after series of doping scandals. In music, I got to know Tu Pac Shakur and the members of Death row; Puff Daddy (P. Diddy), Dolly Parton etc I equally remember Muhammed Ali, the boxer who won acclaim from the media and people the world over. Many more still count but I can’t chronicle them all. Now let us take a look at something. What were the reasons for my somewhat biased admiration of these persons I earlier mentioned? Perhaps, the names were admirable (but there were others like Bebeto, Late Yekini, Roger Miller and co.); or their kinds of profession moved me (I never loved boxing nor did I ever want to become a boxer); perhaps I joined the team of chronic bandwagoners at least for the period their popularities spiralled.

The role models we have many a times are neither angels, saints nor some divine beings. They are mostly humans or a lot of the ones we have as role models are completely humans, bearing frailties of all sorts that could easily drive us far away from them while some persons don’t really care about what kinds of lives their supposed role models lead. I don’t intend to discard the many role models of ours who are angels, saints, divine beings and human but I want to say that we are free to choose whoever and whatever to be our role models – we have reasons to back our varied choices.

We all have several reasons for our choice of role models as I earlier mentioned but have we taken time to think about the pressure we heap on them to perform to our tastes, desires and wishes? For our role models that are human, we don’t always expect them to act as if they are supersonic. Since they can breathe and do all the things that we humans sometimes do, we ought to give them a break in some way by letting them just be. If I am a benefactor for instance and I am someone’s role model for the reason that am a benefactor, the adulation that I receive must spur me on to continue that act of benefaction not for the good of the recipient alone but also for the admiration that I will enjoy from my numerous followers. This could lead to a lot of things though. I could lose probably my entire fortune and for instance take to fraud, lies, deception, stealing or human rituals just to maintain that former status where I doubled as benefactor and role model and at someone’s discomfort. You could go on and on in this analysis but one very important point is that the pressure to be good or extraordinary in the eyes of people is something that could push one to the limits. The role models some persons admire don’t necessarily have the qualities to make them stand out in the positive light as is the case in almost every situation. Pardon me if I am too loquacious although some persons did love Hitler, Idi Amin, and Gaddhafi.  They may be considered some of the evil wheat in the field of the world but those who adore them have reasons to back up their choice of persons who contradict the conventional manner of choosing role models.

Let us take football and talk about something. There are just two footballers in the world who make the world go gaga these days: Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo. They both feature for two spectacular football clubs – Barcelona and Real Madrid of Spain respectively. They both possess an array of exceptional brilliance, skill, magic, and instinct combined with a large fan base and an envious worldwide followership. There is a normal trend of humans to separate two persons of almost equal abilities and this gets people roped when they try to place in this case, Messi and Ronaldo on the first and second cadre of arbitration as regards football as bias and other worthless criteria come in to create confusion. Now, the two footballers are role models in different lights (I don’t care how you wish to prove your point against my statement). The duo being role models mean they have to avoid the things their followers hate and all that especially the negative light we see them from what the media give to us like the life of footballers off-field where womanizing, drinking, and all sorts of attitudes associated with chronic voyeurs, or the use of vulgar language. The duo are both good at what they do, no doubt but the pressure to perform hangs on both of them particularly Cristiano Ronaldo. Messi on the other hand is rated in some quarters as the best. Ronaldo to me does a lot of hard work to go past or catch up Messi by trying to score a lot of goals more than Messi is supposedly thought to be doing to outwit Ronaldo. The Ronaldo I grew up to know was a young, talented winger from Sporting Lisbon who set the Premier League alight while at Manchester United. Although he was equally a goal scorer, he was raking loads of assists as well. At the moment, Ronaldo is a “striker”, getting the goals and almost singlehandedly moving his team along especially in torrid moments (recall the 2011/2012 La Liga title-winning season where he, Benzema and Higuain scored more than half of the Los Blancos goals). Ronaldo attempts to score goals in every game and become the best but it belittles his personality as it breeds a lot of selfishness and self-centredness; he sulks and expects a pat on the back always, feeling frustrated by the day and over working to meet up with being one of the best players on the planet. That is absolutely the price for being a role model to a lot of persons. The pressure is just enough to run one down mentally speaking.

Let us realize therefore that our role models are mere humans and imperfection is a part of their humanic nature and if we are to appreciate them, we won’t talk much about what we think they should do to impress us or become what we think. Whenever we become disillusioned by the unacceptable behaviours of our role models, we should recall they are humans. Some of us get engrossed in the lifestyles of our “role models” to the extent that we don’t attempt to motivate or build up ourselves and let others see us and take us as their own role models. Yes! Role models must set examples for others to follow but how much of those examples benefit the followers? On the part of the followers, would they accept any form of attitude their role models put up or heap hot coals on the heels of their role models to make them less comfortable to carry on the great assignment of living up to the standards set by people? Unless we find ourselves in their shoes, we may never know exactly what it feels like to be a role model to someone let alone scores of persons worldwide whose notion is that you are a demi-god and as such, they expect you to be infallible and become what they wish – a puppetry figure. Now, imagine that you are in this situation. There is no freedom to do the things you would normally do and get away with. You become the centre of attention quite often and whatever you do, good or bad, goes to the media and then to your followers. You must as a role model not set out to do to the letter everything your followers expect of you in their selfishness and unending desires – qualities which befall men’s standing and faults their drive to become wholly perfect beings.

What actually motivates role models to continue to become ever special in the eyes of their followers? Some of them could be motivated by the fact that people appreciate them enough to see them as potential or permanent role models. Perhaps their drive comes from the point where they attempt to continually improve on their performances thus far. There is the problem of hypocrisy on the part of our role models borne out of the pressure we heap on their weighty shoulders to remain as they are in our eyes to make us happy and make them sad – absolutely selfish of us followers! Some of our role models don’t actually help people because they would want to but because they want to maintain that babelic tower which could all come crumbling down at once when they never expected.     

  

ABOUT THE CONTRIBUTOR:

JOHN ATTAH is a graduate of English and Literary Studies from the University of Nigeria whose interests include writing poetry, short story, match reviews and debates of all interesting kinds in print and online media. He also does a lot of Song writing and SMS composition. His short story “The Tea Shop” won him the 3rd prize in 2011 while he was 7th placed in the University’s Martin Luther King Jnr. Essay Competition in 2008. He was a participant at the 2011 Fidelity Bank International Creative Writing Workshop at his school. He blogs at the moment at www.attahojonugwajohn.wordpress.com  while writing as well.  

 

CHELSEA AND THE DOMINO EFFECT OF CHANGE

CHELSEA AND THE DOMINO EFFECT OF CHANGE
BY JOHN ATTAH
Change may supposedly be inevitable in certain situations but it can be evitable in several other situations. The present wave of change at Chelsea Football Club can be avoided. I know some persons may feel at the moment that am saying a whole lot of trash that needs to be held by the dustbin. Well, I think I am not an emporium of football knowledge but I believe I know a thing or two about football and issues surrounding the round leather game. I write not as an independent football viewer but as a fan of a club – Chelsea. In the last few days preceding the hurriedly-executed and painful sacking of Roberto Di Matteo as Chelsea Manager after just six months in charge of a team fresh from winning the Champions League and the FA Cup and equally on track to rebuild a team that has become the banter for opposition fans especially regarding the age differences and the style of football which led to the Munich triumph. Perhaps a lot of persons may have guessed right that Robbie was going to get the job Pep Guardiola had been tipped to occupy after being warmed a little by the Italian notwithstanding the two years contract handed out to him grudgingly. The season begins on quite a good note, producing fine displays from the highly-rated “Champions of Europe” who go unbeaten for over 8 games in the English Premier League which ends after the “Controversial Sunday” against Manchester United that has plunged Chelsea and the players into the ocean of referee consciousness at players’ statements during match days towards referees, racial slurs cum division over the continual goal drought of the Spaniard, Fernando Torres. The controversy begins a chain of poor results for Chelsea and Di Matteo at home in England and abroad in Europe including the last straw that broke the metaphorical camel’s back. At exactly 4 am after the Juventus vs Chelsea game, Di Matteo is shown the door – shocking! A string of poor results could many atimes be blamed on the Manager since he walks alone each time the team is not performing to the expectation of an unsatisfied and bullish club owner; this is what happens to Robbie. So many opinions begin to spring up when the news of his untimely departure is shared amongst football fans the world over. Some feel he merited the door shown him for the poor results but he doesn’t kick the balls on the pitch and can’t do anything than select his team and tell them to do while they do their own things against his wishes by going against instructions; some believe he should have been given more time at least till the end of the season but what if Chelsea don’t qualify for next season’s champions league?; others feel January should have been appropriate to sack him but does that come after signing some great players and managing to at least attempt to blend them?; and others feel he should have been left but Torres be left out of the team, loaned or sold in January which means he has to get another striker or two and make an emergency withdrawal of Lukaku from his West Brom loan where he has already become something of a fan’s favourite and play Sturridge often than not?. Well, opinions could always be different as no one is completely right or wrong.
The end of Roberto Di Matteo’s reign as Chelsea Manager begins a novel reign for a man no Chelsea fan ever dreamt of becoming the next Interim Manager till the end of the 2012/2013 EPL Season in a former rival while Jose Mourinho was in Charge of Chelsea – Rafael Benitez. What an imperfect November surprise for the entire SW6 faithfuls from Roman Abrahmovich! To me it was not the best of appointments after the Spaniard had vowed never to manage a club like Chelsea in his entire life, the money brings the trophies to Chelsea while Arsenal plays better football enough to win them trophies plus other numerous taunts directed at Chelsea, Mourinho, Drogba, and the Chelsea fans. Chelsea fans don’t easily forget and the unearthing of these past remnants of vocal taunts directed at the club is something worth commending. When Mourinho was snapped up by Inter Milan, he brought in Samuel Eto’o, the Camerounian from Barcelona. Recall that before that time, Eto’O had said he will never play in a team managed by the enigmatic Portuguese but he did and won the Champions league, the Serie A and host of other team honours and personal accolades –humans are indeed wonderful! Eto’O almost killed himself alongside his team mates trying to please Mourinho and Moratti. Now, it is time for Benitez to take himself as someone who manages a team as Chelsea even though on the interim till the end of the season after all the empty taunts and talks.
The reign of the unpopular man begins with a houseful of boos and jeers awaiting the former Kop Boss while placards and banners bearing several derogatory words and statements directed at the Spaniard all flowed on the banisters at the various ends of the Stadium while others drummed their unending support for the outgone Di Matteo and showed respect to a Legend in Didier Drogba who was at Stamford Bridge to see the Chelsea vs City game marking the end of Di Matteo and the debut game in charge for Benitez. There were perhaps few positives to take from his first game in charge: Chelsea for the first time in a while didn’t concede, the central defence was better co-ordinated with Ivanovic and Luiz. These few positives are blighted by the consistent incompetence and sulking composure of Torres in front of goal and his response to issues concerning him and his questionable failure in a Blue shirt, the most recent for a striker after Shevchenko and Pizarro’s unforgettably annoying failure at Chelsea. I hope the owner’s eyes are watching to see what has been allowed to happen at his behest by his perhaps anonymous-during-decision-making-advisers? Does he allow the 50 million pound man to remain as a Chelsea flop or let him leave on loan or permanently without a bit of bias and emotion? Does he allow Benitez who managed the Spaniard at Liverpool time to put him once again on the scoring charts after these few months of revival by challenging other younger strikers of his caliber cum the experienced ones like Van Persie? Does he think Pep Guardiola will be the perfect fit in the somewhat continual puzzle at Stamford Bridge to unravel the mysteries behind the doom and the gloom that surround managers and players especially strikers? Will he allow Pep the freedom to do what he feels okay for the good of the team having done a great job at Barcelona? These questions should be considered by the Owner and see how well it is for the team and the fans.
I was indeed privileged to see Benitez’s second game in charge of Chelsea which produced the same result as that of Sunday the 25th November, 2012. Perhaps many may look at it as Chelsea are not conceding at the moment but I have to say that it matters a lot if Chelsea and Torres can’t score goals and win games in two games under the Spaniard who is at the moment bringing in a wave of change to the tactics and team sheets of his immediate predecessor whose formation was a sometime 4-2-3-1 or a more consistent 4-3-3 as opposed to Benitez’s usage of a double defensive midfielder pairing with a one-man striker up front. As regards the team sheets since the last two games, he has brought in Romeu more than before especially in the Fulham game where he played the full ninety minutes bagging a yellow card for all his duties on the pitch – Mikel was on the bench alongside Mata, Moses, Marin, Cahill and co while Bertrand somehow found his way into the team for the game on Wednesday against Fulham at Stamford Bridge. Hmm! It was more worrisome with the fans leaving in drones disappointed over a poor game with chances and the rhythm of the ooohs and aaahs undulating the boos and anger spicing the match I myself saw in unrepentant anger and frustration as a Chelsea fan. I hope the Manager for the interim learns a lot more than I hope he has already learnt or hopes to learn coaching a team of Chelsea’s calibre? The first away game for Benitez comes up at West Ham and hope we don’t see another goalless draw? I hope, Mr. Abrahmovich the everlasting chain of change and the hire and fire strategy doesn’t go on and on? Let someone come in permanently and let’s all rest from all these news not worth listening to from the Chelsea camp or else the chain will continue to wrench the necks of the unlucky Managers. Afterall, there have been 8 Managers before Benitez and there could be more except if the rod of the Russian moneyman drops completely. I hope for a better change at SW6 with the new enemy we’re sleeping with or someone else; perhaps time for Torres to move on? Chelsea for life anyway!

JOHN ATTAH is a graduate of English and Literary Studies from the University of Nigeria whose interests include writing poetry, short story, match reviews and debates of all interesting kinds in print and online media. He also does a lot of Song writing and SMS composition. His short story “The Tea Shop” won him the 3rd prize in 2011 while he was 7th placed in the University’s Martin Luther King Jnr Essay Competition in 2008. He blogs at the moment on http://www.wordpress.com while writing as well.

WHY I AM STILL WRITING

Image,An attempt at really exposing the reason or reasons why I am still writing may seem easy to say but most difficult when one moves beyond mere words. I have a feeling that writing requires skill and technique; like in soccer, a player requires a handful of skill, technique, psychological balance, and experience to be at the top of his game likewise a writer who requires a whole lot of things – reading ability, writing skill, technique, experience, and all the other necessary ingredients to spice up his literary soup.

One important thing that I feel I grew up with and which is still nascent but extremely budding is my reading and writing. I wouldn’t say I grew up in a completely Academic environment where I read books from day one like Chimamanda Adichie, but I was privileged to have siblings who taught me the hard way as I sat beside my eldest brother, receiving the doleful number of knocks on my head each time I failed to pronounce a word correctly or misspelt while writing.

My writing began anonymously and I never knew I could craft words out of the blue or try to make language more beautiful than the everyday expressions that beget clichés and all those which sometimes make English less attractive and boring.  Writing to me is definitely a craft, an art that requires some of the things i have earlier mentioned and many more depending on varied treatments and somewhat different opinions by individuals.

Writing to me has become something like a positive curse in that if i leave it for long, i could fall ill. I may not be a household name at the moment but i think from the few stupidly creative things i have written especially poetry and short story lately, i can say that writing anytime at all motivates me alot. The motivation that accrues from writing either on a daily, weekly, monthly or yearly basis is something else. Everyday, i try my hand at writing something no matter how stupid or inconsequential it may seem to people who read them. Take for instance the English Premier League match reviews i write almost every other weekend. There are few persons who would take interest in something of that sort and still there are a handful of others who would never tell you anything positive but it gives me motivation and crowns it with joy. I don’t actually know how it would have been without writing for me because i see something in me which needs a little more time to develop and then, bang!, there would be whispers in secluded corners and in the secret open about a certain Nigerian whose nomenclature could be mistaken for the reborn late Ghanaian President.

Writing has to be my lifeblood which means alot to me as a person. It gives me that freedom to express myself more than when i speak. The weirdest of thoughts, crazy enough to make people hate me come via my writing and the most creative to make them love me or appreciate my style of writing comes still via my writing which is a proof beyond doubt that i love writing and will write till i die. For me, writing may not have been a do-or-die affair but it is something that i can’t neglect completely. Whenever this writers’ block come on board, i don’t get that bored especially while reading something i have written or scribbled previously no matter the manner in which it has been written or the personal criticism i would attach to such a half job. I write because i cannot let the passion die just like that and my feeling that i could write even better than my contemporaries spurs me on to always improve on my past as regards writing in general. My writing does not dwell on poetry, Short stories etc at the moment but also reclines on essays and almost every kind of writing as well. The few writers’ workshops i have attended plus some of the essay competitions i have participated in have continued to enkindle the literary fire blazing deep inside of me and it gets me motivated more than ever to do what my mind has followed for a long time . 

In summary, i write for people, about people, for myself, about myself or situations and at other times, create something that seem real – fiction they call it, where things that don’t happen in actual life situations happen or take place. I just have to keep my life going by writing words for people to read and expose myself to the emotions in the world and the variation of expressions and emotions that greet the words that come together to form something sensible, and then make people understand their stance as regards certain situations where decision may make or mar a person. Writing to me has been the best thing to happen to me because i don’t regret!

 

JOHN ATTAH is a poet and a short story writer whose writings have appeared online and in print.  He studied English and Literary Studies from the University of Nigeria, Nsukka. His short story ‘The Tea Shop’ won the 3rd prize at the Literary Festival while in school.

[slideshare id=13435965&doc=sarabaelectronicmagazine-120624082733-phpapp02&type=d]